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SOESD / Technology & Media Services / Media Materials Library / Online Curriculum Resources / Science\STEM Curriculum Sites

Science\STEM Curriculum Sites

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General Science Curriculum Sites        
  • How Stuff Works         
    http://www.howstuffworks.com/
    Gives clear information on how things work--including computer stuff, auto stuff, electronic stuff, home stuff, and more.
  • National Geographic Teacher Page      
    http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/?ar_a=1
    Multimedia lesson plans for grades 1-12.
  • Science Links         
    http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/
    Internet-based learning activities. Reviewed websites to support standards-based learning for K-12 educators
  • Purdue zipTrips         
    http://www.purdue.edu/ziptrips/
    Free virtual field trips that bring Purdue University scientists into your classroom.  Trips include visits to labs, greenhouses, aquaculture facilities, Discovery Park, the vet school and other places. Student cna email questons during the trip for the scientist to answer.  
  • Rice University: Explore Science - One Game at a Time         
    http://webadventures.rice.edu/index.html​
    Includes six online interactive games appropriate for middle and high school students.  In each game, students take on the role of a scientist to solve a crime, conduct experiments, and learn about the scientific method and processes.  
  • Everyday Mysteries: Fun Science Facts from the Library of Congress
    http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/
    From the website “Did you ever wonder why a camel has a hump? If you can really tell the weather by listening to the chirp of a cricket? Or why our joints make popping sounds? These questions deal with everyday phenomena that we often take for granted, but each can be explained scientifically.” All of the questions presented on this Web site were asked by researchers and answered by librarians from the Library's Science Reference Services.
  • Science fair resources
    http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral
    This website has project suggestions, shopping lists, presentation guidelines, and resources for parents and science fair coordinators
  • The Henry Ford Museum
    http://www.thehenryford.org
    The Henry Ford Museum showcases the people and ideas that have fired our imaginations and changed our lives. The museum’s Web site features a number of digital resources: DigiKits, seven unit plans using digitized artifacts from the museum’s online collections; ExhibitBuilder, where students and teachers can create an online exhibit with the museum’s digitized collections; and Innovation 101, a curriculum encouraging innovation through interview clips with today’s hottest innovators.
  • Exploratorium Online
    http://www.exploratorium.edu/explore/handson.html
    Exploratorium Online features dozens of online learning activities and exhibits. Make a mold terrarium, pinhole projector, telescope or hair hygrometer. Explore the brain, biodiversity, Antarctica, DNA, frogs, structures or illusions. Learn about magnetism, electricity, motors, eyeballs, perception, Mars, chocolate, seasonings or the science of cooking, sports and music. Search more than 3,000 photos and movies and watch Webcasts of science demonstrations by teachers.
  • A Science Odyssey
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/
    A Science Odyssey is a PBS television series that highlights some of the most spectacular discoveries in science and technology during the 20th century. The Then + Now section of the program’s website compares what we knew in 1900 to what we know today. In That’s My Theory, students meet some of the scientists who made twentieth-century history on a made-for-the-web game show. On the Edge is a set of comic-book-style stories that take students back through time, introducing them to scientists soon after they made their discoveries. You Try It includes cool activities, including Atom Builder, Probe the Brain, Radio Transmission, Technology at Home, and Mountain Maker, Earth Shaker. And People and Discoveries features a databank of biographies of scientists and descriptions of key events and discoveries. In addition, the site presents an Educator’s Guide with activities, discussion questions and information for using A Science Odyssey in the classroom. A resource list supplies information on books and other websites and videos related to the programs or activities.
  • World Wide Science
    http://worldwidescience.org/
    “WorldWideScience.org is a global science gateway-accelerating scientific discovery and progress through a multilateral partnership to enable federated searching of national and international scientific databases and portals.”
  • Scientists @ the Smithsonian
    http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/scientist/index.html
    All kinds of people become scientists, and scientists do all kinds of things. On Scientists @ the Smithsonian, students can watch and read about 21 scientists at the Smithsonian, including Liz Cottrell, volcano watcher; Conrad Labandeira, fossel hunter; the Freer Team, art scientists, Stefan Schnitzer, jungle explorer, and Mary Hagedorn, reef doctor. The site also includes Women in Science—an archive of photographs showing women scientists and engineers at work as well as women trained in science and engineering who work outside the laboratory as librarians, writers, political activists or in other areas where their work informed or was informed by science.
  • Scientific American 60-Second Science
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/podcasts.cfm
    Scientific American’s 60-Second Science podcasts are worth exploring, subscribing to and sharing with students. Titles such as “Microbes Make Some People Smell Delicious to Mosquitos” and “It’s Plain the Rain Ups Chili Peppers’ Pain” are not only highly informative, they’re great discussion starters too. Access the complete list of 60-Second Science podcasts on Scientific American’s website and check out all the other podcasts as well. The list includes Science Talk, 60-Second Mind, 60-Second Health, 60-Second Earth, 60-Second Tech and more.
  • Science of Everyday Life
    This Discovery Education/3M website has lesson plans and videos on everyday applications of science. 
    Scitable
    This site is a free resource affiliated with Nature and Scientific American that provides course packs, discussions, blogs, chat features, and videos. 
    Middle school science website
    http://www.middleschoolscience.com
    This website has resources for middle-school science teachers, including lesson plans in chemistry, earth sciences, life sciences, and physics
    Education Planet-Science
    Education Planet-Science has more than 45,000 lesson plans in all areas of science and more than 1,000 Web links for additional science exploration.
    Exploring Time
    http://www.exploringtime.org/
    Exploring Time is an interactive site that allows middle and high school students to explore change over time. 
    How to Smile
    http://www.howtosmile.org/
    How to Smile, an AASL best website winner for 2012, has activities for math and science. Registration is required but the site is free.
    Bam! Body and Mind
    https://www.cdc.gov/bam/index.html
    BAM! Body and Mind offered by the Center for Disease Control offers standards linked, interactive activities for science and health.
     
Science: Astronomy Sites        
  • Space Shuttle Columbia Tragedy         
    http://www.eduhound.com/columbiatragedy.html
    Links to information about the shuttle, its crew and information on the tragedy of February 1, 2003.
  • The Space Place(NASA)         
    http://spaceplace.jpl.nasa.gov/spacepl.htm
    Astronomy topics, activities, terms, facts and missions.
  • Solar System Tour
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/tour-solar-system.html
    Your students can explore the planets, visit the moon and gaze at the stars in this 3-D interactive model of the solar system. With one click, they can visit Saturn, Venus or the other planets and then spin and explore them in three dimensions. The interface uses NASA calculations to precisely position all celestial bodies. Students click to watch the positions of the planets and moon change as time passes. If they’re impatient, they can click ahead to see how the stars align in the year 2100.
  • WorldWide Telescope
    http://www.worldwidetelescope.org/Home.aspx
    WorldWide Telescope (WWT) enables your computer to function as a virtual telescope, bringing together imagery from the best ground and space-based telescopes in the world. Narrated guided tours from astronomers and educators feature interesting places in the sky. The idea is to democratize the science of astronomy with a single tool that can be used by students and scientists. A Web-based version of WorldWide Telescope enables seamless, guided explorations of the universe from within a Web browser on PC and Intel Mac OS X by using the power of Microsoft Silverlight 3.0.
  • Google Moon
    http://www.google.com/moon/
    It's similar to Google Maps. Satellite photos are stitched together so you can view the moon's surface. Google includes information on all six lunar Apollo missions. You can view the landing sites and follow the astronauts' exploration paths. Lots of historic information and photos are provided as well. This is a great site to share with your kids!
     

Science: Biology Sites    
  • Plants in Motion 
    http://plantsinmotion.bio.indiana.edu/plantmotion/starthere.html
    Great site to show how plants grow. Can be used for any age.
  • eBird 
    http://ebird.org/ebird/eBirdReports?cmd=Start
    This site gives information on birds in your area, migratory patterns.  It includes information about birds and the oil spill.
  • Animalia
    http://www.animalia.tv/
    On this BBC interactive Web site based on the classic children’s book Animalia, two children, Alex and Zoe, stumble into a magical library that transports them to the animal-inhabited world of Animalia. Strange events have undermined the Animalian civilization, and Alex and Zoe join forces with their new friends G'Bubu the gorilla and Iggy the iguana to save Animalia.
  • Home Garden Improvements
    http://www.nationwidemortgages.net/home-garden-improvements.html​
    This site provides a pletora of links about vegetable and flower gardening, plus gardening for kids.  
  • My First Garden
    http://urbanext.illinois.edu/firstgarden/
    Learning about gardens, flowers, vegetables and the principles of horticulture can be a really fun experience for you and the children you teach. The University of Illinois’s My First Garden Web site is intended for elementary students to learn about the beauty of gardens and the care involved in planning, nurturing and enjoying the benefits of gardening in a variety of spaces and places. As students go through the basics, the FUNdamentals and the process of planning a garden, they will be acquiring skills that will last a lifetime. The site is accessible in English and Spanish.
  • Kids Guide to Planting a Flower Garden
    http://www.avasflowers.net/kids-guide-to-planting-a-flower-garden
    Provides step-by-step instructions for planting a flower garden in language appropriate for older elementary students. The author also links to other helpful sites on gardening with children - some for students and some for adults working with students.   
  • Macaulay Library Sound & Video Catalog
    http://www.animalbehaviorarchive.org
    K-12 students can listen to sound clips, view video clips and also see visualizations of animal sounds and behavior. Has thousands of sound clips, representing approx. 2/3 of the world’s birds, plus increasing numbers of insects, fish, frogs and mammals. Searchable by common name, scientific name, location (even by latitude and longitude!) and more.
  • WhyReef
    http://www.youtube.com/WhyReef
    Explore the underwater world of coral reefs. At the Chicago Field Museum’s WhyReef site, students will learn the signs of a healthy reef and find out what can make it sick. They’ll swim with the different creatures that live in and around a coral reef and play WhyReef’s food web game to find out who eats whom on a reef. Encourage students to dive into WhyReef at different times of the day. They never know when a great white shark or a giant sea turtle might swim by!
  • Journey North
    http://www.learner.org/jnorth/
    http://www.learner.org/jnorth/KidsJourneyNorth.html
    Journey North is a free, Internet-based program that explores the interrelated aspects of seasonal change. Through interrelated investigations, students discover that sunlight drives all living systems, and they learn about the dynamic ecosystem that surrounds and connects them. Journey North for Kids is a simple, student-directed entry point to Journey North studies. Engaging stories, photos, videos and slideshows from the natural world build observation skills, inspire scientific thinking and create fertile ground for discussions and new questions.
  • Micropolitan Museum
    For several centuries artists have depicted the human figure, still-lives, landscapes or non-figurative motifs. One subject has been widely neglected all those years: Micro-organisms.
    The Micropolitan Museum finally exhibits these often overlooked works of art which are only visible with the aid of the microscope. Curator Wim van Egmond has collected the finest microscopic masterpieces nature has ever produced during eons of natural selection.
  • Insect Images : The Source for Entomology Photos
    "Thousands of (mostly) public domain photographs of insects and related organisms. 
    And thousands of photographs on related entomology and forestry subjects (plants, animals, plant diseases, etc.). Reach these through Statistics, Forestry images, Forest Pests, and IPM images links."
    Neuroscience for Kids website 
    This site has multiple resources for helping students understand how their brains work.
    GeneEd Web
    http://geneed.nlm.nih.gov/
    "GeneEd Web, developed and maintained by the National Library of Medicine
    (NLM) and the National Human Genome Institute (NHGRI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is a safe and useful resource for students and teachers in grades 9 - 12 to learn genetics. The Web site allows the user to explore topics such as Cell Biology, DNA, Genes, Chromosomes, Heredity/Inheritance Patterns,Epigenetics/Inheritance and the Environment, Genetic Conditions, Evolution, Biostatistics, Biotechnology, DNA Forensics, and Top Issues in Genetics."
    Encyclopedia of Life
    http://eol.org/
    Encyclopedia of Life houses information and pictures of all known species of animals, plants, fungi, protists, and bacteria.
    Mammals R US
    http://www.mammalsrus.com/
    Easy to use, but full of information. A mammal tree for teaching the relationships between mammals.
     
     


     
Science: Chemistry Sites
  • Science Education at Jefferson Lab         
    http://education.jlab.org/
    Activities to explain how scientists measure the size of an atom, what fabrics will keep you the warmest, how to build a boat so that it caGeneEd Web
    http://geneed.nlm.nih.gov/
    "GeneEd Web, developed and maintained by the National Library of Medicine
    (NLM) and the National Human Genome Institute (NHGRI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), is a safe and useful resource for students and teachers in grades 9 - 12 to learn genetics. The Web site allows the user to explore topics such as Cell Biology, DNA, Genes, Chromosomes, Heredity/Inheritance Patterns,Epigenetics/Inheritance and the Environment, Genetic Conditions, Evolution, Biostatistics, Biotechnology, DNA Forensics, and Top Issues in Genetics."rries the most cargo, the periodic table of elements, and other science matters. Includes teacher resources, flash cards, matching games, and crossword puzzles. Searchable. From the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility
  • Periodic Videos TED-Ed Lessons         
    http://ed.ted.com/periodic-videos​
    TED-Ed and Periodic Videos teamed up to create a video and TED-Ed lesson for each of the elements in the periodic table.  
  • Chem 4 Kids!         
    http://www.chem4kids.com/
    Learn about the states of matter; the periodic table; the structure of atoms; formulas and symbols; and reactions (acids and bases). Refer to the glossary for definitions and try a quiz.
  • Chemtutor.com         
    http://www.chemtutor.com/
    Are you in need of a chemistry tutor? Then you have come to the right place. Browse through topics such as Elements, States of Matter, Compounds, Reactions, and Acids and Bases.
  • Chemical Education Digital Library
    http://www.chemeddl.org/
    The Chemical Education Digital Library (ChemED DL] is a large collection of resources for teaching and learning chemistry. ChemEd DL contains tutorials for students that include 3-D chemical models and explanations of what each part of the model does and how those parts work together. The ChemTeacher section has free, downloadable lesson plans organized by subject. ChemEd DL also features a periodic table that links each element to data and explanations about that element.
  • Why chemistry matters
    http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/chemistry_matters.html.
    This website features four Nobel laureates explaining their lives as chemists, their work, and the beauty of chemistry.
     

 

Science: Earth Science Sites
  • Understanding Geologic Time         
    http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/education/explorations/tours/geotime/
    This site introduces students  in grades 5 through 10  to geologic time, the evidence for events in Earth's history, relative and absolute dating techniques, and the significance of the geologic time scale. Includes interactive quizzes, and lesson plans for teachers. From the Museum of Paleontology, University of California, Berkeley.
  • Ice Stories
    http://icestories.exploratorium.edu/dispatches/index.php
    Ice Stories: Dispatches from Polar Scientists introduces students to penguin biologists, glaciologists, cosmologists, geologists and marine scientists working in Antarctica and the Arctic. Using cameras and blogging tools, they are documenting their adventures so students can follow their research, ask questions and share in their discoveries as they occur. This experiment gives students an up-close-and-personal look at research in extreme environments through the thoughts and experiences of the scientists working there. Their photos, videos and blogs are posted on the site.
  • Anatomy of a Tsunami
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/anatomy-tsunami.html
    On the morning of December 26, 2004, many coastal residents of northwestern Sumatra were startled as water at the shore dramatically receded below the normal low-water mark, leaving fish flapping on the exposed beach. The people drawn closer to the coast by this remarkable sight surely didn't know how to explain the water's bizarre behavior. Yet even in the early hours of the tsunami disaster, scientists began to grasp what was happening. PBS NOVA’s Web site presents two interactives that will help students understand the tsunami that took place in 2004 as well as the recent tsunami that occurred in Japan and spread to the west coast of the United States. In Anatomy of a Tsunami, students can follow the tsunami from its birth at the seafloor to its devastating collision with coasts around the Indian Ocean.
  • Science Storms
    http://www.msichicago.org/whats-here/exhibits/science-storms/the-exhibit/
    The Museum of Science+Industry in Chicago presents Science Storms, an interactive exhibit that reveals the science behind seven natural phenomena—lightning, fire, tornadoes, avalanches, tsunamis, sunlight and atoms in motion. It’s a perfect storm of physics, chemistry and curiosity.
  • Leafsnap
    This website helps students identify trees by their leaves – including using a free iPad app to match a photo of a leaf with online images.
  • Weather Spark
    "WeatherSpark is a new type of weather website, with interactive weather graphs that allow you to pan and zoom through the entire history of any weather station on earth. Get multiple forecasts for the current location, overlaid on records and averages to put it all in context."
  • Google Street View---Underwater
    In the five years since its launch in 2007, Google Street View has been a strictly above-ground experience. Although it has occasionally left the comfort of the open road for a river (as when it visited the Amazon) or an icy expanse (as when it documented the remote sites of Antarctica), it has never taken us down below, into the waters that cover 70 percent of our planet. Google’s new addition to Street View does just that, providing “street” view access to six of the world’s most beautiful underwater landscapes. The project—made possible through a partnership with the Catlin Seaview Survey—gives Google users a chance to swim around the Great Barrier Reef, Hawaii’s Molokini Crater, its Hanauma Bay and the Apo Islands in the Philippines. The 50,000 stitched-together images come from a special underwater camera—the SVII—that divers bring eight meters below the water’s surface. They take shots every four seconds, which can then be fed into Street View. 
  • Fall Colors Depend on the Weather Changes
    USA Today has a simple interactive illustration that students can click through to see how the weather affects the color of leaves. Students can select individual tree leaves to see what different leaves look like throughout the seasons. 
    Maine’s Autumn Magic
    http://www.maine.gov/doc/foliage/kids/movie.htmlTo help students understand why leaves change colors, Maine’s Forest Service website displays an animated video, titled “Maine’s Autumn Magic,” which explains how leaves reveal their fall colors. The site also has a glossary of tree terms http://www.maine.gov/doc/foliage/kids/glossary.html  to help students understand some of the terms in the video.
    Formation of Snowflakes video
    http://www.bytesizescience.com/index.cfm/2012/12/17/The%20Chemistry%20of%20SnowflakesTTThis video from the American Chemistry Society’s (ACS) Chemistry for Life series tracks the formation of snowflakes from their origins in bits of dust in clouds that become droplets of water falling to Earth. When the droplets cool, six crystal faces form because water molecules bond in hexagonal networks when they freeze. The video explains that ice crystals grow fastest at the corners between the faces, fostering development of the six branches that exist in most snowflakes. As snowflakes continue to develop, the branches can spread, grow long and pointy, or branch off into new arms. As each snowflake rises and falls through warmer and cooler air, it develops its own distinctive shape.
    Geology.com
    http://geology.com/teacher/
    Earth Science Teaching Plans and Classroom Activities
    Geology Websites from the Surf Report
    http://www.ecb.org/surf/geology.htm
    The surf report is a monthly annotated list of vetted websites. It originates in Michigan, so some of the links might be focused on that region of the country. 
    NOAA Weather
    www.education.noaa.gov
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) offers education resource collections on topics like weather systems and patterns, ocean currents, and climate monitoring.
    Infotopia : Climate Change
    http://www.infotopia.info/climate_change.html
    A page of links of global warming/climate change sites.
    The authors of the site have tried to be balanced in their approach while trying to appeal to different levels.
     
Science: Environmental Education Sites
  • Energy Tutorial         
    http://www.nfcrc.uci.edu/EnergyTutorial/
    A browsable overview of energy sources, featuring photographs, statistics, and quizzes. Topics include fossil fuels, oil shale, nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and wastes, hydroelectric, fuel cell, combustion, gasification, reciprocating engine, and turbines. Also explores environmental impacts and trends. From the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC), University of California, Irvine.
  • Meet the Greens
    http://www.meetthegreens.org/
    This is a site for youth about sustainability and green living. THE GREENS project encourages youngsters to think about the world and their place
    in it. Through the animated episodic adventures, a blog, kids’ mail and regular updates, students explore green living, sustainability, ecology, environmental care and social equity. The project nudges youth to do research, to challenge, to discover and to take action wherever and whenever they can. Green Business named THE GREENS as one of the “Ten Best Environmental Sites on the Web.”
  • World Wildlife Foundation
    http://www.worldwildlife.org/how/fun/index.html
    At the World Wildlife Foundation’s Web site, students can send a postcard to a friend or play one of the interactive wildlife games and learn about endangered species, wild places and global challenges along the way. Check out the WWF online Action Kit for more activities and find out how your students can to be a force for nature.
  • 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill
    http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/oilspill
    This Science NetLinks website relates science, social studies, and political science to the Deepwater Horizon BP disaster.
  • Power-Up Game
    http://www.powerupthegame.org/
    Free online game, challenges teenagers to help save the planet, “Helios” from ecological disaster.
  • DiscoverWater
    http://www.discoverwater.org/
    The Project WET Foundation’s new DiscoverWater website is a free online resource for students and teachers about water and water-related topics, including water on Earth, the water cycle, oceans, fresh water, watersheds, water conservation and protection, direct and indirect water use, and water and health.
  • Students measure their ecological footprint 
    This website lets students take a quiz on the impact of their consumption of energy, food, housing, and goods and services – and the amount of waste produced that must be absorbed by the earth. Students can then develop plans to decrease their environmental impact.
    Environmental health activities
    This website features Tox Town and allows students to explore health concerns and toxic substances they may encounter where they live, work, or play. The website is available in Spanish
    .U.S. Dept. of Energy : K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/education/lessonplans/
    "Offers 350 lessons on energy efficiency and renewable energy. They're organized by grade level and topic -- biomass, geothermal, fuel cells, ocean energy, solar power, transportation fuels, wind energy, and energy efficiency and conservation. Learn about passive solar buildings, advanced photovoltaics, or basic wind turbines. Take an energy awareness quiz.
    Estimate your carbon footprint; find ways to reduce it"

     

Science: Physical Science Sites
 

  • Kinetic City
    http://www.kineticcity.com
    Kinetic City is a collection of science experiments, games and projects for students in grades 3–5 to enjoy both online and away from the computer. The Kinetic City Super Crew needs your students’ help to save their virtual world of Vearth from the science-distorting computer virus Deep Delete. The more your students play, the more standards-based science content they will learn! Kinetic City is a production of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Sign up online to start a Kinetic City Club; it’s easy and it’s free.
  • Science of NFL Football
    http://www.lessonopoly.org/nfl
    Science of NFL Football is a 10-part video series created by NBC Learn in partnership with the National Football League (NFL). Featuring exclusive footage and contributions from NFL players and scientists from the National Science Foundation, the series helps teach students concepts such as nutrition, kinematics and projectile motion. Lessonopoly has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series.
  • Circus Physics
    http://www.pbs.org/opb/circus/classroom/circus-physics/
    The Big Apple Circus’s jugglers, clowns and high-flying acrobats provide an entertaining and engaging way to introduce basic physics concepts to high school students. Circus Physics is a series of eight short videos, each of which feature footage from the PBS Circus series and interviews with the performers to illustrate the laws of physics at work. For deeper exploration, each video has a corresponding Study Guide for students and an Activity Guide for teachers, as well as raw video clips of performances that can be used for analysis in the classroom.
     
Science: STEM Sites
  • STEMconnector
    http://stemconnector.org/
    The new STEMconnector website serves as a one-stop national gateway for “who’s doing what” in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. The site features detailed profiles and uses the latest technology to connect massive amounts of data found within the STEM Pipeline for users. STEMconnector profile categories include National STEM Organizations; Corporations, Professional Organizations, Associations and Professional Societies; Diversity Groups; Women & Girls; Think Tanks; Foundations; Federal Government; National Laboratories; Education; International Organizations and more. Numerous categories and subcategories are included, and extensive information about STEM programs, missions and linkages are cross-indexed. In 2012 the site will be adding more content, including research reports, information on internships and scholarships. Users will also have the ability to update profiles.
  • Engineering, Gor For It! (eGFI)
    http://www.egfi-k12.org/#
    Information about the many branches of engineering presented in an engaging format for K-12 in an effort to foster educational and pre-professional interest in engineering and other STEM fields.  
  • Museo Galileo
    http://portalegalileo.museogalileo.it/egjr.asp?c=16205
    This website presents the scientific instruments that Galileo conceived or constructed through educational and interactive applications, films and in-depth examinations. Students can explore Galileo’s inventions, such as the compass, telescope, microscope. They’ll learn the history of the invention and discover its component parts and how it operates through interactive 3-D models. They’ll also get a better understanding of what the invention is used for through interactive animations.
  • Time Engineers
    http://www.software-kids.com/te_catapult.htm
    On the Time Engineers website, students come across a Time Engineers binder that contains confidential information on a time-travel machine that the United States government built to travel back in time to obtain and document the history of engineering. The document contains three chapters, each with their own space–time coordinate for time travel. The chapters contain mission briefings, engineering tasks and mission commander assistance. The final document contains a map showing the location of the time machine and start-up procedure. With the documents in hand, students are ready to begin their journey back in time. The catapult simulation covers algebra, physical science, technology and history.
  • Sloan Career Cornerstone Center
    http://www.careercornerstone.org/
    The Sloan Career Cornerstone Center is an ever-expanding resource for anyone interested in exploring career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, computing and healthcare. Students can explore more than 185 degree fields and find out about education requirements, salaries, networking, precollege ideas and career planning resources. They can also browse interviews with hundreds of professionals who offer candid insight into their own diverse careers. Most resources are also accessible as free downloadable PDFs, PowerPoints and podcasts.
  • Women in Science
    http://www.womeninscience.org/
    Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics ON THE AIR! is a radio series for young girls, young women, parents, middle and high school teachers, college professors, guidance counselors, researchers, organizational leaders and anyone interested in learning more about the past, present and future role of women in science and technology education, fields and careers. Listen to stories about fascinating women working and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields; and learn about programs and practices throughout the U.S. designed to broaden the participation of women in STEM.
  • Spark 101
    Real-world STEM professionals break down real-life STEM challenges that help inspire students to pursue STEM careers.  
  • Engineering magazine online : eGFI
    Engineering: Go for It! or eGFI is an online magazine for middle- and high-school students created by the American Society of Engineering Education aimed at showcasing innovations in engineering – for example, algae-based fuel, a skyscraper with rotating floors, and artificial limbs. 


     
 



 




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Music Curriculum Sites
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Online Curriculum Resources 1
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SOESD
SOESD
SOESD
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Medford, OR 97501
Phone: 541-776.8560/800.460.6454
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