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SOESD / Technology & Media Services / Media Materials Library / Online Curriculum Resources / Online Curriculum Resources 1

General Social Studies Curriculum Sites, Newspapers/Current Events Sites, Geography Sites, Primary Sources Sites, World History and Culture Sites

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General Social Studies Curriculum Sites
  • Social Studies for Kids         
    http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/
    Need to make a timeline, find out about holidays in another country, or read a brief biography of a U.S. president? Links and information on everything from current events to ancient archeology and other homework topics are available at this site. The author is an education professional with a lifelong passion for social studies.
  • Teacher Oz.com         
    http://www.teacheroz.com/
    Maintained by a social studies teacher, this site has very complete links to most types of historical information any grade level would need.
  • Biography.com         
    http://www.biography.com/
    Great place to start when researching a person's life. Short bios. Also includes who was born on this day. From the Biography Channel folks.
  • Best of History Web Sites         
    http://www.besthistorysites.net/
    Sites rated for usefulness and accuracy. Cover all historic eras.
  • AwesomeStories
    http://www.awesomestories.com
    AwesomeStories features a collection of multimedia primary source materials—photos, video, audio and historical documents—held together in a series of digital stories about films, famous trials, disaster and historical events. When you become a member of Awesome Stories—membership is free—you can see everything on the site (including an extensive image database), explore all its features (including narrated stories), dig deeper (with lesson plans and text documents) and stay up to date with a free newsletter profiling current events and hot topics.
  • Historical Thinking Matters
    http://historicalthinkingmatters.org/ Historical Thinking Matters features four historical thinking investigations through which students learn about the Spanish-American War, the Scopes Trial, Rosa Parks and Social Security. Each of the investigations provides students with background information in the forms of video, images, audio and text (both primary and secondary sources). As they progress through the investigations, students use the Historical Thinking Matters student notebook to answer guiding questions and take notes. At the end of an investigation, students write a short essay forming reasonable conclusions about the past and email their work, including the notes from their notebooks, directly to their teachers. Resources for instructors, preservice teachers and teacher-educators include classroom materials and strategies, examples of student and teacher work, and supplementary sources.
  • Mrdonn
    http://www.mrdonn.org/
    This site has so many things in it. Lots of resources for any era of history you would be interested in. Teacher resources as well as student resources.
  • The food timeline
    Ever wonder how the ancient Romans fed their armies? What the pioneers cooked along the Oregon Trail? Who invented the potato chip...and why? So do we!!! Food history presents a fascinating buffet of popular lore and contradictory facts. Some experts say it's impossible to express this topic in exact timeline format. They are correct. Most foods are not invented; they evolve.
  • Museum Box
    “This site provides the tools for you to build up an argument or description of an event, person or historical period by placing items in a virtual box.”
    Life magazine photos online 
    Hundreds of news, celebrity, travel, animal, and sports photos from the pages of Life magazine are now available free online. Life was a large-format news/photo magazine read by millions of Americans from the 1930s through its demise in 1972.
    Sweet Search: Biographies
    http://www.sweetsearch.com/biographies?categories=&category1=all&category2=all&category3=all
    Search can be narrowed by category of profession, country, timeframe. 
     
     
Decades Research Sites
  • Decades
    http://www.infotopia.info/am_history_decades.html
    Infotopia and related websites are Google alternative search engines, including only websites previously recommended by teachers and librarians.
  • Just Social Studies
    http://whhhsmediacenter.wikispaces.com/Just+Social+Studies
    Scroll down to History and then to Decades.
  • Infoplease : Year by Year
    http://ph.infoplease.com/yearbyyear.html
    Timeline year by year featuring details about events and culture. Included: award-winners, population stats and more.
  • American Cultural History : The Twentieth Century
    http://kclibrary.lonestar.edu/decades.html
    Organized by decade, a great website with tons of information about all aspects of life.
    Content covered: art, architecture, business, literature, immigration, education, news, events, music, theater, science, technology and social movements. Also a section on “American Popular Music”.
  • Decades
    http://www.infotopia.info/am_history_decades.html
    Infotopia.info is an academic search engine accessing only trusted websites previously selected by librarians, teachers and library and educational consortia.  As a Google custom search engine, Infotopia has most of the cool Google search features, but with more relevant results. With Infotopia, 'Safe Search' is always on.


     

Social Studies: Newspapers/Current Events Sites
  • Historic Oregon Newspapers
    http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/
    Search and access complete content for Oregon newspapers published before 1923. The newspapers have been digitized and are fully searchable.  There's also a K-12 Resources tab with lessons. Explore with your students the way forestry, the Oregon Caves, immigration, or even tattoos have been historically covered in Oregon newspapers.     
  • The Week in Rap
    http://theweekinrap.com/
    The Week in Rap produces a weekly roundup of current events, presented in a rap video. Longer-form history lessons are also rapped. The site was created by Flocabulary, and the songs and videos are written by Flocabulary artists.
  • Newseum
    http://www.newseum.org/
     
    The new Newseum, in Washington D.C., traces the development of news over time and shows how technological advances—from line art in newspapers to TV helicopters to the Internet—have changed the way news is delivered and presented. Visitors to the Newseum’s Web site can take a cool 3-D tour of the new museum, view more than 500 front pages of newspapers from around the world and play the online trivia game NewsMania.
  • News is Free         
    http://www.newsisfree.com/
    This site offers news headlines, with links to the full stories, from more than 3,600 Web sources. It includes world, sports, entertainment, science, health, technology, economic, and other news. Basic site information is available in English, French, or German; the sources cited are in their original language. Site is searchable, and may also be browsed through a categorized index. Free registration allows for personal customizing and there are also fee based options.
  • News Link
    Useful media page covers Newspapers, TV, Magazines from all over the world. 
     
        

Social Studies: Geography Sites
  • Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection
    http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/
    Terrific collections of maps—current and historical. Includes maps on topics of special interest such as Iraq and Afghanistan. 
  • Improve Knowledge of Geography
    http://www.ilike2learn.com/
    Do your students know all the countries in Europe? Developed by a teacher, this interactive site can help improve students’ geographical knowledge. Try the “easy” quiz to name the European nations. Also find quizzes for the longest river, highest mountain, U.S. state capitals, lakes in Africa—and more.
  • TeachersFirst’s Globetrackers Mission
    http://www.teachersfirst.com/globetracker/about.cfm
    TeachersFirst’s Globetracker’s Mission is an engaging way for students in grades 2–6 to learn geography, map skills and world cultures through an episodic story. Each week, a new episode, in the format of a blog post, appears on the Globetracker’s Mission site. The “blog” is written by fictional teenagers Geo and Meri as they travel the seven continents of the world on a secret “mission” for an unnamed government agency. They seek clues and travel under the supervision of their Uncle Globetracker, writing the “blog” as part of their requirements for missing high school work. Classes who follow the mission learn standards-based terms and concepts of world geography as they respond to Geo and Meri’s think-aloud questions, using maps, images and links that Geo and Meri provide. Concepts include landforms, map skills, cultures, major landmarks, continents, oceans, rivers—and more. 
  • Worldmapper
    http://www.worldmapper.org/index.html
    Worldmapper is a collection of world maps, where territories are re-sized on each map according to the proportion of different resources they share, and by their contributions to human society. Presently the site includes nearly 600 maps. Maps 1–366 are also available as PDF posters. Use the menu at the top of the homepage to find a map of interest. Subjects range from Youth Literacy to Education to Pollution and even to Population in Year 1 and Year 2050!
  • National Geographic : My Wonderful World
    http://www.mywonderfulworld.org/index.html
    My Wonderful World, a National Geographic Society Web site, integrates geographic literacy into the content areas using multimedia resources, such as 2-D and 3-D maps, images, blogs, videos, digital games, quizzes and awareness campaigns. Students can conduct research into cultural, environmental and geographic issues, listen to world music, take virtual tours and add landmarks to maps. The Wayfaring feature lets students (collaboratively or individually) create their own personalized maps and share them with other students.
  • AirPano
    http://www.airpano.com/
    AirPano offers dozens of spectacular 360-degree panoramas of famous landmarks and cities around the world. The panoramas can be set to auto-play with a music accompaniment, or you can navigate the panoramas manually. To find a panorama on AirPano, you can browse the listings, search by keyword or view a Google Map of all of the places AirPano has captured. AirPano panoramas can be viewed in high or low resolution according to the speed of your Internet connection. The panoramas can be viewed on an iPhone or iPad. You can also view the AirPano files in Google Earth.
  • Animaps
     http://www.animaps.com
    Animaps is a service that allows users to create animated Google Maps. Using Animaps, you can create a tour of your placemarks that plays through according to the timing that you specify. You can also build in colored shapes to expand and contract to demonstrate patterns. And you can import images to your map from Flickr, Picassa and Facebook.
  • OldMapsOnline
    http://www.oldmapsonline.org
    The OldMapsOnline Portal is an easy-to-use gateway to historical maps in libraries around the world. It allows the user to search for online digital historical maps across numerous, different collections via a geographical search. To search, type a place name or click in the map window, and narrow by date. The search results provide a direct link to the map image on the website of the host institution.
  • Global knowledge quiz
    This website  has continent, cultural geography, and physical geography quizzes drawn from the National Geographic Society’s Bee competitions. Tough questions.
  • Waymarking
    Waymarking – a way of using GPS technology to identify unique places and share them with others.
  • Geocaching
    These websites help students get going with Geocaching--hiding a cache of information or goodies at a specific set of coordinates.
  • Geography games 
    This site  (Sheppard Software) has a wide variety of free games for students at different levels.
    Lizard Point Map Quizzes
    On this website, students can take map tests on the continents, countries, states, provinces, territories, and cities.
    National Geographic 125 Years : Images
    From a pioneering ascent of Everest to advancements in aerial, underwater and space photography, the National Geographic Society has been exploring the world for 125 years. To mark that milestone, in January National Geographic published galleries of landmark images of exploration from over the last 125 years. One of the galleries is Flashback Firsts, which, as the name implies, features “firsts” of explorations published in National Geographic magazine. Flashback Firsts includes images of Robert Peary’s 1909 Arctic expedition, Hiram Bingham’s expedition to the ancient Inca city of Machu Picchu in 1915, the first American team’s climb to the summit of Mount Everest in 1963—and more. 
    United States Map Puzzle
    This online game asks students to assemble the U.S. map from the unlabeled puzzle-piece shapes of the 50 states. It’s definitely not easy.
    Fact Monster: Countries of the World
    http://www.factmonster.com/countries.html
    A large list of country profiles. Each country has information on the geography, maps, flag, history, current ruler, area, population, capital, largest cities, ethnicity and race of population, literacy rate, economy and government.
    Scholastic’s Global Trek 
    http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/globaltrek/ 
    This site lets you plan your own virtual trip to any of 35 different countries, read all about their cultures and customs, and write down all that you learn in your own travel journal.
    Mapping Worlds.com
    http://show.mappingworlds.com/world/
    "Select a subject from the top menu and watch the countries on the map change their size. Instead of land mass, the size of each country will represent the data for that subject --both its share of the total and absolute value."
    Reading Maps
    http://www.learner.org/courses/amerhistory/interactives/cartographic/index.html
    Reading Maps, a free interactive from PBS Learning Media, helps students at grades 6–12 learn the visual language of maps (perspective, symbols and data) and see how mapping techniques have changed over time. The interactive gives them practice at looking at maps as historical artifacts.


     
Social Studies: Primary Sources Sites
  • How To Use Primary Sources         
    http://www.jerseyhistory.org/howtofind.html
    The New Jersey Historical Society offers four sample lessons online that illustrate wise instructional use of primary source documents.
  •  National Archives--DocsTeach
    http://docsteach.org/
    DocsTeach, a new online tool from the National Archives, combines primary-source content with the latest interactive capabilities of the Internet. The site features more than 2,500 documents along with engaging classroom activities. Yet the most exciting part of the site is also what makes students so interested in new technologies—the interactive feature that allows you to direct what the site becomes. On the site you can browse or search for activities by era, based on the historical thinking skills you want to teach, according to an interactive DocsTeach.org activity creation tool, by keyword or even by activity author—you can find activities created by the National Archives education team or by fellow educators around the country who are registered on DocsTeach.org. You can use the information that accompanies each activity to determine if it is a fit for your classroom, and whether it will help you meet your curriculum objectives. The information includes an indication of the historical thinking skill students will practice; a representation of the level of critical thinking required, illustrated by an icon reflecting Bloom’s Taxonomy; the historical era in which the activity fits; an activity synopsis; and instructions. You can customize any activity to fit the needs of your unique classroom by selecting “Use to Create an Activity” to make a new activity based on a current one; edit existing activity information and student instructions; or choose alternative primary source documents. You can create a brand-new activity with its own Web address, and you can save and organize your activities in your own account and share them with your students.
  • American Memory Collection         
    http://memory.loc.gov/
    American Memory is the Library of Congress's online archive of primary sources that relate to the history and culture of America.
  • Teaching With Primary Sources
    http://www.smithsoniansource.org/tea/viewdetails.aspx
    The Smithsonian Source provides a great overview of how to use primary-source documents, images and more in your classroom. Provides lesson plans, videos on specific lesson plans to show how to utilize primary source materials.
  • History  Heard  
    http://www.historyheard.com/home.html?
    History Heard is a free database of primary source video interviews for students to tap into as they conduct research for class assignments or extra-credit projects. Created by two high school students who have experienced the research process, History Heard aims to make history research “come alive” for middle school and high school students across America. Your students can help to grow the video collection by creating video interviews with individuals who have been firsthand witnesses to modern history. The events may be as broad as describing life in a particular community during a specific era, or the moment in history may be as specific as a single event. The Getting Started section of the Web site provides information on how to create a History Heard video.  
  • In the First Person   
    http://www.inthefirstperson.com
    The Smithsonian Source provides a great overview of how to use primary-source documents, images and more in your classroom. Provides lesson plans, videos on specific lesson plans to show how to utilize primary source materials.
  • History Buff.com
    HistoryBuff.com is a nonprofit organization devoted to providing free primary source materials for students, teachers and history buffs. The site focuses primarily on how news of major, and not so major, events in American history was reported in newspapers of the time. The online newspaper archive is organized by year and event. The earliest newspapers in the archive were published in 1707. The newspapers can be viewed in detail through the zoom tool accompanying each newspaper. In addition, there is information about the technology used to produce newspapers over the past 400 years. The latest addition to the site is a set of 15 panoramas of historic sites in America. Some of the panoramas you will find in the collection include Davy Crockett’s childhood home, Appomattox Courthouse, Thomas Edison’s birthplace and Valley Forge. 
    HATs: History Assessments of Thinking 
    Working with the San Francisco and Lincoln (NE) public schools, a group of educators at Stanford University has created a set of 10-minute assessment tasks that measure how well students can analyze documents from the Library of Congress – letters, books, photographs, prints, speeches, interviews, radio broadcasts, and film clips. These HATs, along with interactive rubrics and student responses, are available for free.
    Adviews
    http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/adviews/
    AdViews: A Digital Archive of Vintage Television Commercials - Duke Libraries.
    Retronaut
    http://www.retronaut.com/
    This website is a collaborative storehouse for images, audio, and video from the past.  Content is categorized by time periods, eras and clusters​

Social Studies: World History and Culture Sites
  • Eyewitness to History
    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/index.html
     
    EyeWitness to History is your students’ ringside seat to history—from the ancient world to the present. The program, presented by Ibis Communications, a digital publisher of educational programming, uses firsthand accounts along with film clips and audio (voices) from the past. Students will also find notable quotes, a photo of the week and snapshots of events that happened in the current month.
  • Historical Treasure Chests Activities
    http://ciese.org/curriculum/treasure/
    The Historical Treasure Chests activities from the Stevens Institute of Technology engage students in investigating authentic materials from the past. Students are provided with four primary sources and questions to guide their investigation. A wealth of other primary resources can be accessed on the Web sites listed in the reference section. By looking closely for details, students draw conclusions about the items and formulate their own hypotheses about the time period(s) during which the materials were created. Further research, using secondary sources, will either confirm or challenge their ideas.
  • Yin Yu Tan
    http://www.pem.org/sites/yinyutang/house/base.html
    Yin Yu Tan, a late Qing dynasty merchants’ house, was originally located in southeastern China. Re-erected at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, Yin Yu Tan is now open to visitors. Explore the house online to discover this rare example of the region’s renowned architecture and to learn about the daily life of the Huang family, who lived in Yin Yu Tang for more than 200 years. The Peabody Essex Museum’s Web site takes you on a virtual tour of the house with print and audio narratives, pictures, videos and copies of correspondence sent between family members.
    Check out this Primary Source World activity, which includes questions and documents related to the house to make connections between geography and Chinese culture for students in grades 5–12. 
  • Visual Culture of Spanish America
    http://www.smith.edu/vistas/  (in English)
    http://www.smith.edu/vistas/vistas_web/espanol/index.html (in Spanish)
    The Vistas project at Smith College in Massachusetts seeks to bring an understanding of the visual culture of Spanish America to a broad audience. Spanish America was an extensive region—covering much of the Americas, running from California to Chile from the 16th century to the early 19th century. Its visual culture was forged in urban centers, religious and frontier communities, and indigenous towns. The Vistas Web site offers easy access in English and Spanish to key components of this project. The Web site provides a gallery of more than 100 color images, interpretive essays and a searchable bibliography on visual culture. The site also includes a glossary of English and Spanish.
  • Zon/New Chengo (Culture and Languages of China)
    http://enterzon.com/
    A new, cost-free Web-based role-playing game aims to help students and adults learn more about the culture and languages of China. Called Zon/New Chengo, the multiplayer game was created by Yong Zhao, Michigan State University distinguished professor of educational psychology and technology. A native of a poor, remote area of the Sichuan Province, he has become a highly influential researcher in Chinese education. The goal for the player is to fare well and advance socially and economically, with players moving from “tourists” to “residents” and finally to “citizens” of modern China. At the different stages, players encounter quests, have access to learning materials—including live Chinese tutors—and are able to organize and participate in social activities.
  • Cleopatra: A Multimedia Guide to the Ancient World         
    http://www.artic.edu/cleo/
    An interactive guide to the Ancient Art Collection of The Art Institute of Chicago that focuses on the three cultures of the ancient M erranean: Italy, Egypt, and Greece. Eighteen objects are featured, each with close-up views and related stories in audio. There are also a timeline, glossary which comes with an audio pronunciation guide, maps, and lesson plans for grades 4 through 12. Also available in Spanish, except for the audio files and lesson plans.  
  • Tudor England: 1485 to 1603         
    http://englishhistory.net/tudor.html
    Biographical and historical information on Tudor monarchs, including Henry VII, Henry VIII and his six wives, Edward VI, Jane I (Lady Jane Grey), Mary I, and Elizabeth I; Tudor relatives; and other citizens. Includes images, primary sources (including letters written by Henry VIII's wives), life in Tudor England, genealogy, bibliography, and filmography. Frequently updated with new material. From a hobbyist.
  • Explore Ancient Eqypt
    Want to walk around the Sphinx? Clamber inside the Great Pyramid of Giza and seek out the pharaoh’s burial chamber? Visit the magnificent tombs and temples of ancient Thebes? NOVA’s Explore Ancient Egypt, a multilayered, highly visual interactive, lets students view 360-degree panoramas, “walkaround” photos and other breathtaking imagery shot throughout the Giza Plateau and ancient Thebes (modern-day Luxor), often with special permission. They’ll see Old and New Kingdom tombs and temples, pyramids and statues, and a 140-foot-long wooden boat that is 4,600 years old.
  • Teaching the Milddle East : A Resource for Educators
    http://teachmiddleeast.lib.uchicago.edu
    Teaching the Middle East: A Resource for Educators was written by scholars in the field of Middle Eastern studies and created in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities and three University of Chicago units—the Oriental Institute, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the eCUIP Digital Library Project. The core Foundations lesson plans help students gain a broader understanding of the Middle East. Historical Perspectives lessons compare aspects of culture before and after the advent of Islam. Classroom Connections help teachers explore and share their newfound knowledge with students. Each learning module contains scholarly essays to help frame the issues and examine stereotypes. For each learning module, high school educators have created two lesson plans with guiding questions for student research and classroom discussion.
  • Coming of Age Now
    http://comingofagenow.org
    Produced by the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City, Coming of Age Now is a free, interactive online curriculum that teaches middle school and high school students about the Holocaust through the powerful stories of young people who survived. Students will learn to connect this history to the world today, exploring themes of identify and personal responsibility. The website integrates first-person videos and narratives of Holocaust survivors, artifact explorations, student projects and online discussions.
  • World History Sources
    http://chnm.gmu.edu/worldhistorysources/index.html
    "World History teachers face many challenges to incorporating primary sources in their teaching—the pressures of coverage in survey courses, the lack of available materials, and inadequate training in dealing with unfamiliar sources from a range of cultures. World History Sources responds to these challenges (as well as the new opportunities offered by the Internet) by creating a website to help world history teachers and students locate, analyze, and learn from online primary sources and to further their understanding of the complex nature of world history, especially the issues of cultural contact and globalization."
  • TimeMap of World History
    "The TimeMap of World History is an all-inclusive look at world history. It combines maps, timelines and chronological narratives that work together to enhance historical understanding. New content added daily."
    Worldwise Schools
    Sponsored by the Peace Corps educators can access more than 50 interactive lessons.
    A Variety of Calendars
    This site is a museum of calendars in use today – Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Jewish – as well as some no longer being used – Mayan, Roman, and the French Revolutionary Calendar.
    Maya Adventure
    http://www.smm.org/sln/ma/
    "The Science Museum of Minnesota presents Maya Adventure, a World-Wide Web site that highlights science activities and information related to ancient and modern Maya culture."
    Collapse : Why Do Civilizations Fall?
    http://www.learner.org/interactives/collapse/
    "Join us as we explore the collapse of four ancient civilizations. You'll learn what happens when a society collapses and how archaeologists find and interpret evidence. You can visit the Maya city of Copán and search for clues to its collapse. You can also try your hand at "garbage-ology" and study what trash can tell us about a society."​
    Titanic Research Guide
    http://libguides.se.edu/titanic
    Titanic research guides from Southeast Oklahoma University.​ Includes timeline, PowerPoint, links to newspaper articles and more.
    Rome Reborn
    http://vimeo.com/32038695
    What did ancient Rome look like in 320 CE? Rome Reborn is an international initiative to create a 3-D digital model of the Eternal City at a time when Rome’s population had reached its peak (about 1 million) and the first Christian churches were being built. The result is a truly stunning bird’s-eye and ground view of ancient Rome that will make students feel as if they were actually there.
    Examine Objects from Imperial China
    http://www.earlyimperialchina.co.uk/room.html
    Scrolling over objects in this present-day classroom takes students back to Early Imperial China. They can pull down the projector screen, for example, and view a slideshow about the building of the Great Wall. They can change the carousel and zoom in on the details of a brick found in a burial chamber. Or open a drawer and find pictures of silk, ceramics, rice and tea from Imperial China along with an interactive that helps them understand the production process. It’s all great fun—and rich with information!
    3-D Re-creation of the wreck of La Luna
    http://www.operationlune.com/en/
    Have your students ever wanted to go deep-sea diving? Well, now they can! Take your class on an underwater virtual field trip and visit a 3-D recreation of the wreck of La Luna, the former flagship of King Louis XIV. The wreck was recently discovered off the coast of Toulon, in southern France, with a treasure trove of more than 60,000 objects. Students can visit the site of the wreck and explore the objects that were strewn across the seabed when it sank in 1664. They can navigate around on their own or take a guided tour. Created by Dassault Systemes, using a prototype underwater camera aboard a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), the 420-square-meter La Luna wreck site is being captured with absolute accuracy in realistic 3-D. The resulting 3-D model is being used by the archeological team for training divers and testing new techniques for exploring.




     



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